HD Advisor January 7, 2011 - High-Def Digest Forums
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Old 01-06-2011, 04:56 PM
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Default HD Advisor January 7, 2011

The HD Advisor returns for the New Year:

http://www.highdefdigest.com/news/sh...Gigawatts/6108
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Old 01-07-2011, 03:23 PM
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I thought it was jigawatts
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Old 01-07-2011, 03:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericede View Post
I thought it was jigawatts
That's how Doc Brown pronounces it, but he's refering to gigawatts. At least, according to Wikipedia:

Quote:
The power required is pronounced in the film as "one point twenty-one jiggawatts".[1] While the closed-captioning in home video versions spells the word as it appears in the script, jigowatt,[4] the actual spelling matches the standard prefix and the term for power of "one billion watts": gigawatt. Though obscure, the "j" sound at the beginning of the SI prefix giga- is still an acceptable pronunciation for "gigawatt".[5][6] In the DVD commentary for Back to the Future, Robert Zemeckis stated that he had thought it was pronounced this way because this was how the scientific advisor that he had for the film pronounced it.[7]
I think we can chalk this up to Doc Brown being eccentric.
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Old 01-07-2011, 03:49 PM
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I read somewhere years ago that it's supposed to be pronounced the way Doc Brown does. it has the same prefix as the word Gigantic, and we all know how to pronounce that, so saying it like Jigawatt makes sense. when gigabyte became a common term, people were pronouncing it wrong from the start and never broke the bad habit.
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:02 PM
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for Cable Audio Hook-ups, one thing you might be able to do is run an HDMI to the TV and take the cable box's digital audio out to your receiver.

if the cable box has both outputs, of course.

that way the tv is always getting the pure video signal and audio, and the receiver is always getting audio.

then you just turn down the tv audio if you want the receiver, or leave the receiver off if you want tv audio.

the digital can't carry anything better than dolby 5.1, but that doesn't matter since that's the best that will be coming out of your cable box anyway.

this is how my system is set and it works flawlessly.
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skycracksopen View Post
I read somewhere years ago that it's supposed to be pronounced the way Doc Brown does. it has the same prefix as the word Gigantic, and we all know how to pronounce that, so saying it like Jigawatt makes sense. when gigabyte became a common term, people were pronouncing it wrong from the start and never broke the bad habit.
Huh... and now I know and I have new respect for Doc Brown!
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:29 PM
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Default Sony Pillarbox Settings

To the person with the two Sony players. To pillarbox normal DVDs:

S360
Settings>Video Settings
TV Type should be 16:9
Screen Format should be Fixed Aspect Ratio
DVD Aspect Ratio should be Letter Box

S370
Settings>Screen Settings
TV Type should be 16:9
Screen Format should be Fixed Aspect Ratio
DVD Aspect Ratio should be Letter Box


Hope this helps.
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:34 PM
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i have a sony blu-ray as well and it only "forces" 4:3 picture on high def content that is 4:3. (the first half of Simpsons Season 20 for example) i personally have gotten used to the stretch image look so i dont like the pilarbox effect so it annoys me to manually have to stretch it when it happens. lol actually even my PS3 does that now that i think about it.

although when it comes to SD content, the 4:3 stuff is always automatically stretched by default. i've never had to change any settings or whatnot. but its sorta funny, i used to complain about black bars on top and bottom of the screen in my pre HD tv days but kept buying widescreen anyway because i knew id eventually have an HD set and it be fine there. but when i did get my first HD set i complained about the bars on the side for 4:3 programming til my brother showed me you can stretch.

i am strange. lol
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Old 01-07-2011, 04:38 PM
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It sounds like you the problem can be fixed by changing the TV setting in the blu-ray player from 16:9 widescreen to 16:9 pillarbox.
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Old 01-07-2011, 05:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skycracksopen View Post
for Cable Audio Hook-ups, one thing you might be able to do is run an HDMI to the TV and take the cable box's digital audio out to your receiver.

if the cable box has both outputs, of course.

that way the tv is always getting the pure video signal and audio, and the receiver is always getting audio.

then you just turn down the tv audio if you want the receiver, or leave the receiver off if you want tv audio.

the digital can't carry anything better than dolby 5.1, but that doesn't matter since that's the best that will be coming out of your cable box anyway.

this is how my system is set and it works flawlessly.
That was my idea as well. I could have used HDMI to the receiver for my AT&T U-verse STB (made by Cisco), but I chose HDMI to TV/optical to receiver instead because my receiver (Sony HT-SS2300) takes less time to recover from changing channels that way; I also understand U-verse STBs have had surround-sound bugs which were worse on HDMI than optical. (As you said, you lose nothing on the audio end with optical/coax as the best cable--or OTA TV, for that matter--can do is DD 5.1.)

My TV (Vizio V032LF) will pass DD from HDMI in to optical out. However, U-verse uses LPCM 2.0 on non-surround sound broadcasts, which my TV won't pass to optical out if it's set to pass DD. (With that set to DD, its OTA tuner would not output the audio-only channels of the local 3ABN low-power digital transmitter until 3ABN changed them from LPCM to DD 2.0.) Running optical straight from STB to receiver avoids this problem.

(I should add that when I had Comcast, my Motorola STB with HDMI out also worked better that way.)
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