UltraViolet media locker may allow DVD scanning for access - High-Def Digest Forums
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Old 03-14-2011, 01:55 PM
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Default UltraViolet media locker may allow DVD scanning for access

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The UltraViolet digital media standard could use a customer's own DVDs as a way of giving them permanent access to a movie, insiders said Monday. Partners in the group are mulling an option for users to scan in their DVDs and get access to any movie that matches up with the UV library. The approach described to CNET would be a way of encouraging viewers to get into the UV system without forcing them to give up an existing catalog.
Disputes have surfaced as to the viability of the strategy. As with music, some traditional outlets are concerned about disc trading being used to overcome the method. Someone who had a DVD could hand it to someone else and promptly get the same access as the original owner, the sources said. One objecting studio has floated the possibility of random checks, but the approach would defeat the purpose of the cloud locker and might create problems for owners of ultraportable notebooks without optical drives.

Basic issues such as whether or not to offer HD are still up for debate in spite of its ubiquity in online video.

Adoption will also be a challenge. Major companies such as Comcast, Microsoft, Netflix, Nokia, Sony, and major studios all support UV, as do the major movie studios. Talks are reportedly underway with cable companies and Internet providers beyond Comcast to get UV lockers that could be integrated with their existing services. However, two of the largest companies in media, Apple and Disney, have declined to support it.

Disney already has its own system, Keychest, but Apple has typically insisted on an all-or-nothing approach to standards. It has usually argued that it either has no copy protection at all, such as with its iTunes music store, or else that it has to use its own FairPlay copy protection format. CEO Steve Jobs has argued in the past that a generic copy protection standard is not only inherently less secure but raises doubts about who's liable when content is invariably pirated.

UV is still young and won't see the first compatible devices ship until the middle of this year at the earliest, with service also likely to show at the same time. An ecosystem might not truly be established until the start of 2012 and a wave of new devices.
http://www.electronista.com/articles....movie.rights/
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:07 PM
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WoW!

The fact that they are even considering that is amazing! Would be awesome to take your entire physical library and immediately use it to build your UltraViolet catalog.
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:27 PM
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Originally Posted by PSound View Post
WoW!

The fact that they are even considering that is amazing! Would be awesome to take your entire physical library and immediately use it to build your UltraViolet catalog.
According to The new Cnet article they may or may not allow HD content.

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But even as progressive as this sounds, some studio execs acknowledge that moving the public to a new format now won't be easy. For one thing, UV's launch is coming up fast and important details still need to be hashed out. Insiders say consortium members still can't agree on several important issues regarding security and whether to offer UV in high-def. Some studios involved are worried that some among them will break ranks and offer content to other locker services in addition to UV, which could undermine UV's negotiating power.
http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-20...?tag=mncol;txt
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by towergrove View Post
According to The new Cnet article they may or may not allow HD content.


http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-20...?tag=mncol;txt
Offering HD for stand-alone purchase is a no-brainer.

I think the question revolves around giving someone access to an HD version if they enable access to a title with DVD.
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by PSound View Post
Offering HD for stand-alone purchase is a no-brainer.

I think the question revolves around giving someone access to an HD version if they enable access to a title with DVD.
Overall this is great news though!
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Old 03-14-2011, 02:45 PM
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"Disputes have surfaced as to the viability of the strategy. As with music, some traditional outlets are concerned about disc trading being used to overcome the method. Someone who had a DVD could hand it to someone else and promptly get the same access as the original owner, the sources said."

Exactly why it won't be offered.
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Old 03-14-2011, 05:34 PM
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Most humans won't bother to trade discs and those that would take the time to do that would not have probably bought the content anyway, so those issues are always overstated by the studios.

I can understand though the initial hesitation of only standard definition version access at first as that would suffice for portable and mobile and computer devices, which is a initial goal and would limit the initial impact on cannibalization of possible short and near term Blu-ray catalog sales of high definition content. If HD content was then enabled it could be seen later as an enhancement to the UltraViolet eco system.

As a consumer though, I'd like both instant access to my DVD library and HD access from the cloud to my purchased movies.

The scanning of existing physical discs though, in effect negates the value added feature of adding it to physical media sales as then in effect any DVD or Blu-ray current or prior purchase would be a UV enabled bit of content. Some studios would clearly see that as a move that would just be throwing away revenue and may not be required in the near term.
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Old 03-14-2011, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by PSound View Post
Offering HD for stand-alone purchase is a no-brainer.

I think the question revolves around giving someone access to an HD version if they enable access to a title with DVD.
No the question should be if someone purchases a Blu-Ray copy of a film, are they then entitled to be able to view the same movie in any other format (up to and including 1080p resolution) from any source for free?

If I buy the Blu-Ray of Fellowship of the Ring extended edition, can I then be allowed to stream the 1080p, 1080i, 720p, 480i, etc. versions that may be available from UV associated sites or am I limited to streaming only the *exact* version (resolution) of what I purchased?

What about the Theatrical cut?

What about if it is airing on HBO PPV in 1080i? Do I get to watch that at no charge?

Will it be free to DL a copy of the movie to my Iphone in 480x320?

It seems to me that this whole mess is just going to confuse and frustrate the consumers by "Clouding" up the issue of media ownership.

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Old 03-14-2011, 06:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Kosty View Post
Most humans won't bother to trade discs and those that would take the time to do that would not have probably bought the content anyway, so those issues are always overstated by the studios.

I can understand though the initial hesitation of only standard definition version access at first as that would suffice for portable and mobile and computer devices, which is a initial goal and would limit the initial impact on cannibalization of possible short and near term Blu-ray catalog sales of high definition content. If HD content was then enabled it could be seen later as an enhancement to the UltraViolet eco system.

As a consumer though, I'd like both instant access to my DVD library and HD access from the cloud to my purchased movies.

The scanning of existing physical discs though, in effect negates the value added feature of adding it to physical media sales as then in effect any DVD or Blu-ray current or prior purchase would be a UV enabled bit of content. Some studios would clearly see that as a move that would just be throwing away revenue and may not be required in the near term.
I don't think the studios will ultimately have this feature, for the reasons you stated above and because of the "trading" issue. People do crazy stuff to save a buck or two. I remember one person used to brag about how his neighborhood shared a Netflix subscription and passed rented discs around.

Seems like more hassle than it's worth, but who knows.


Anyway, the mere fact that they are seriously considering this feature is pretty amazing. It shows some forward thinking by the studios to build a consumer friendly EST offering that has traditionally been a poor model for ownership (the current EST model that is tied to one provider, etc).
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Old 03-14-2011, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by PSound View Post
I don't think the studios will ultimately have this feature, for the reasons you stated above and because of the "trading" issue. People do crazy stuff to save a buck or two. I remember one person used to brag about how his neighborhood shared a Netflix subscription and passed rented discs around.
And thus your own admittedly anecdotal statement helps to prove the point I have been making regarding Netflix basing their claims of more content being viewed via streaming over physical content (which their CEO admitted were based upon the understanding that each time a disc was sent out that it only equaled one viewing) are potentially flawed due to the varied manner in in which consumers use the product in the real world.
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