Study Says Consumers Aren't Cord Cutting - They're Supplementing - High-Def Digest Forums
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Old 11-10-2011, 12:04 PM
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Default Study Says Consumers Aren't Cord Cutting - They're Supplementing

While alternative content providers are doing quite well, they're not taking as much away from cable subscriptions as people like to think.

http://www.homemediamagazine.com/str...tainment-25588
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Old 11-10-2011, 01:51 PM
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I'll keep my money thank you. One or the other for me. I cut cable over a year ago now.
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Old 11-10-2011, 02:01 PM
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I would have cut off cable tv a couple of years ago if it were'nt for my wife wanting to watch garbage reality tv and Slice/Home and Garden type channels. I watch the food network a lot but it's not worth the insane $60+ I pay a month for basic (non HD) Rogers digital cable service.

I imagine a lot of people are limited by their family members wanting to keep broadcast TV we don't need.
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Old 11-10-2011, 02:13 PM
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I had the same issue. The cool thing as that most of the stuff my wife watches eventually makes it over to Netflix. You would be surprised the huge catalouge of shows they have. It's better than cable in a lot of ways. No commercials for one.
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Old 11-10-2011, 06:15 PM
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We cut the cord over 3 years ago and have never looked back. Between our Roku and TiVo boxes, there's an endless variety of channels to watch. Anything current we watch (e.g., local news, game shows, major networks) is pulled down from our OTA antenna, without paying the cable company a single penny.
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Old 11-10-2011, 07:00 PM
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So, the whole "cut the Cable" saying is much more complex than it sounds on the surface: if you "cut the Cable Company cable"...but yet sign-up for ATT's U-Verse 'cable'... have you really "cut the Cable"?

In the last 2 months, this has become a closer concern for me than I would have anticipated. TWC was doing some maintenance in our building, and screwed up my perfectly fine 10mbps Internet service (and had jacked-up my basic cable channels). After about 3-4 false attempts to repair the line, and numerous phone calls, I finally told them to stick it (Internet), but kept the basic channels (which include free HD for the major locals).

The alternative hasn't exactly been a party (and all options, including ATT, have been more expensive or slower). It turns out, my lines ares junk, so ATT couldn't install. I'm making do on Clear 4G...but it's not always rock-solid. Sometimes it's a good 7mbps down. Sometimes when the tower is crowded it's much less.

My point being: if there's no or few alternatives to get a good, reasonably-priced pipeline into your location, "cut the Cable" is a ludicrous notion in the US today. You're going to need Cable or cable in some form, before you can even begin streaming everything all day.

I mean, to watch EVERYTHING via Netflix, Hulu, etc. (especially at 720p or better): What is that? --150gbs a month? more, maybe?
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Old 11-10-2011, 07:07 PM
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And just a couple weeks ago, from the same author and publication as the OP:

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Time Warner Cable Posts VOD Decline

27 Oct, 2011
By: Erik Gruenwedel

No. 2 cable operator reports third-quarter drop in premium channel subscribers and transactional video-on-demand movies

Time Warner Cable Oct. 27 said it lost 128,000 video subscribers during the third quarter (ended Sept. 30) as the economy and entertainment alternatives continue to undermine multichannel video distributors’ sub bases.

The No. 2 cable operator ended the quarter with 11.9 million video subscribers compared with 12 million at the end of the second quarter (ended June 30). TWC said the drop included fewer subscribers to premium channels and a decline in transactional VOD movie rentals — the first time Hollywood’s preferred rental format (over discs) has been singled out.

Indeed, transactional VOD revenue fell $7 million across both Hollywood movies and adult content, according CFO Irene Esteves. Premium channel revenue was down $12 million from Q3 last year and accounted for most of the decline.

In an analyst call, CEO Glenn Britt said declines in transactional VOD were impacted by a dearth of bigger box office hits and over-the-top video distributors such as Netflix.

“It may well be some impact from the over-the-top, so called over-the-top services … but nobody that I know has been able to measure it yet,” Britt said.
http://www.homemediamagazine.com/cab...-decline-25484

Last edited by Wolvie; 11-11-2011 at 09:07 PM. Reason: Added link source
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Old 11-10-2011, 07:26 PM
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Or this recent article, which supports the growing trend of cord-cutting and its impact to cable operators:

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Comcast continues losing cable subscribers to cord-cutting

November 2, 2011 By Mike Flacy

With alternatives like Netflix, Hulu Plus and Amazon's Prime Instant wooing customers away from cable, the subscriber base at most cable companies is dwindling.

Announced in a third quarter earning report earlier today, Comcast informed investors that the company lost approximately 165,000 cable subscribers between the months of July through September of 2011. While cable subscribers continue to remain the most profitable portion of Comcast business, more consumers are dropping cable service for alternative options including over-the-air channels and set-top boxes like the Roku. The average Comcast cable subscriber spent approximately $138.58 per month during the third quarter or a bit over $1,650 a year. With the combined cost of Hulu Plus, Netflix and Amazon Prime Instant just over $270 a year, it’s clear that some consumers are moving away from cable due to financial constraints.

However, Comcast saw an increase of about 261,000 high-speed Internet subscribers during the same time period. This brings the amount of Comcast high-speed Internet subscribers to just under 18 million while video customers have fallen to just over 22 million. It’s likely that a portion of the cable subscribers picked up Comcast high-speed service to access online video sources. While video subscribers have decreased, the rate of decline has fallen since the previous year. During the third quarter of 2010, Comcast lost about 275,000 cable subscribers. Overall, the company posted a profit during the third quarter from a combination of cable, high-speed Internet and voice sales.

According to claims by Time Warner, the rival to Comcast believes that the majority of consumers that cancel service are doing so for financial reasons rather than moving to online video sources. However, Time Warner lost about 128,000 video subscribers in the third quarter of 2011 and gained about 90,000 high-speed Internet subscribers as well. It’s also possible that consumers have started to split services between companies. For instance, using DirecTV to provide satellite access throughout a home and signing up with Time Warner or another cable company for high-speed Internet access.
http://www.digitaltrends.com/home-th...-cord-cutting/
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Old 11-10-2011, 07:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damonous View Post
So, the whole "cut the Cable" saying is much more complex than it sounds on the surface: if you "cut the Cable Company cable"...but yet sign-up for ATT's U-Verse 'cable'... have you really "cut the Cable"?
"Cord-cutting" refers to cancelling one's cable/satellite television subscription. I cancelled my overpriced Comcast cable TV service, and that's why I'm a cord-cutter. As you correctly state, I may still have Internet cable because without it, I'm unable to use over-the-top services like Netflix or a set-top box like Roku. (Actually I'm currently using Clear 4G, bypassing "cable" altogether.) In your example, if I then sign up for AT&T's U-verse services which include a TV package, I would no longer be cord-cutting.

The difference, and primary attraction to cord-cutting, is that I no longer need to pay for cable TV because so many movies and TV shows can now be found on the Internet. And for far less than the cost of pay-TV.
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Old 11-10-2011, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolvie View Post
"Cord-cutting" refers to cancelling one's cable/satellite television subscription. I cancelled my overpriced Comcast cable TV service, and that's why I'm a cord-cutter. As you correctly state, I may still have Internet cable because without it, I'm unable to use over-the-top services like Netflix or a set-top box like Roku. (Actually I'm currently using Clear 4G, bypassing "cable" altogether.) In your example, if I then sign up for AT&T's U-verse services which include a TV package, I would no longer be cord-cutting.

The difference, and primary attraction to cord-cutting, is that I no longer need to pay for cable TV because so many movies and TV shows can now be found on the Internet. And for far less than the cost of pay-TV.
I absolutely 'get' what you're saying about the traditional usage of the term "cord-cutter". But my situation has had me thinking about this a lot lately: that if you still rely on Cable for Internet, you're still giving revenue to the Cable Co and are dependent upon them. And that this whole house of cards (Hulu, Netflix) is banking on the same.

To me, this is a real problem: TWC (or Comcast, whatever) vs ATT U-Verse: little difference. Both way overpriced for content, and ATT is dramatically WORSE (unless you just cannot live without 5000 HD channels of nothingness). Plus, they're even pricier for the 'below the top' Internet service (vs Cable).

BTW, Clear can be nice (and it's the only realistic "no cord" option out there as a single wireless ISP), but it's sporadically equivalent to a landline (at least in today's market). At times Netflix streaming can look as good as on the Cable, but other times it's obvious that adaptive compression is occurring as the Netflix service dynamically adapts to bandwidth drops.
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