Can High Definition DVD's really be collector's items? - High-Def Digest Forums
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Old 08-07-2009, 03:00 AM
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Default Can High Definition DVD's really be collector's items?

Just wondering what some thoughts might be on this subject. I have a few Blu-rays (and HD DVD's) that could be considered very rare or "worth" more than their original selling price. Some of them, based on what I see them going for on Ebay, makes me wonder if I should EVER open them? I know that with some previously ultra-rare high definition movies the point became moot and the value took a nose-dive when it was finally released on both formats (Taking Lives, Blades of Glory), but even with the collectible packaging movies such as steelbooks, is the DVD / BD format something that holds value over the long run? I.E. when the BD format "dies" someday does that remove the value of the collectibles? Did that happen with VHS, Laser Disc, DVD?
I know that the true value of anything is only what someone is willing to pay for it, of course, but I'm wondering if anyone thinks this format will hold value as a collectible item in the long run?
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Old 08-07-2009, 03:32 AM
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They'll never be worth any significant amount and I'll never understand why people refer to their collections as an "investment". Just open as you get the desire to watch.
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Old 08-07-2009, 09:02 AM
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As someone who spent a sizable fortune on laserdiscs back in the day only to watch each and every one of them plummet in value to a dollar or less a piece, I will never make the mistake again of treating my movie collection as an "investment". The same thing has happened with DVDs. I just traded in a huge box of DVDs at Moviestop the other day. A good many of them rang up at $.55 to $.85. The most I got for any single title was $11 for a box set that originally cost $60.

Movie collections do not retain value. As soon as a movie is released on a new format, the old release drops like a rock. People don't care about the physical copy. They only care about the content, however they can get it in the best quality.

The way I see it, I paid my money for my own personal enjoyment of the movie and the disc. So long as I get some enjoyment out of watching or owning it, I don't care how little I sell it for on the back end. It served its purpose.

So, no, I would never leave a movie sealed and unwatched in the hope that it appreciates in value.
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Old 08-07-2009, 09:12 AM
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the main ones that will retain value are those titles that go OOP, and are not available for a while or ever again.
or extremely special versions--like the first press "Akira" or Italian first press "For A Few Dollars More"
other than those cases, I wouldn't worry about it too much.
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Old 08-07-2009, 11:14 AM
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I sold my Tool Salival DVD for over $100 after paying $25 originally, but I believe that's because it was only released once and was a very limited edition. I have a sealed copy of the Star Wars special editions on laserdisc, but I don't have any expectations of the value increasing, I just think it looks cool.
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Old 08-07-2009, 11:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAngles View Post
I sold my Tool Salival DVD for over $100 after paying $25 originally, but I believe that's because it was only released once and was a very limited edition. I have a sealed copy of the Star Wars special editions on laserdisc, but I don't have any expectations of the value increasing, I just think it looks cool.
It is amazing how much people are willing to pay for that! I have a mint copy of it too. Opened it but never watched the DVD or listened to the CD. A buddy of mine wants to buy it from me so bad.
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Old 08-07-2009, 01:44 PM
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I sold that Tool set for $100 as well.




Josh, why did you sell your stuff at such a low price???

There are tons of places that would have given you way more than what you got.
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Old 08-07-2009, 02:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheez avenger View Post
Josh, why did you sell your stuff at such a low price???

There are tons of places that would have given you way more than what you got.
The objective was to clear out a bunch of discs that I'd never watch again. Most of them are movies I've upgraded to Blu-ray. It wasn't worth my time or effort to try to sell them off piecemeal hoping for a couple dollars extra. I really just wanted to get them out of the house.

I got enough store credit for 6 Blu-rays, 4 of them Criterions, so that was fine by me.
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Old 08-07-2009, 03:19 PM
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Completely depends on how many copies of the movie are made and how much people actually want it (I've sold a few DVDs for over $100 (The Killer was the first DVD I made a decent amount of profit off), but for the most part it's not usually a good idea just buying something just with the intention of flipping it in the future. This site is good for letting you know exactly which movies are OOP and how much they go for, though. www.rareoopdvds.com
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Old 08-07-2009, 03:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrAngles View Post
I sold my Tool Salival DVD for over $100 after paying $25 originally, but I believe that's because it was only released once and was a very limited edition. I have a sealed copy of the Star Wars special editions on laserdisc, but I don't have any expectations of the value increasing, I just think it looks cool.
Yeah, the Salival set has high resale value because it was limited to begin with, and has never been rereleased. If you want to hear the songs on that set, buying the old out-of-print version is your only option. If Tool ever puts those songs on a new release, the value of the old set will immediately drop. It's content that causes resale value the majority of the time, not any specific release.
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