'Top Gun - 3D' - High-Def Digest Review - Page 2 - High-Def Digest Forums
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  #11  
Old 02-04-2013, 02:16 PM
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Heh, true enough, wonder why the 80's seems like such a confused decade. Still as you say it's nowhere near as much as in Top Gun and not as obvious. At least Gossett was dancing to good music lol(who can not not move a little to James Brown?).

Oh and on that note, Iron Eagle also features a MUCH better soundtrack. I'll take Gimme Some Lovin' or Queen's One Vision over Highway to the Dangerzone any day of the week.
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  #12  
Old 02-04-2013, 02:42 PM
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If/when this drops to $10, I'll be mildly interested for nostalgia's sake (even though I was never a fan)... but a full $20? No thanks.
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  #13  
Old 02-04-2013, 03:21 PM
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LOL you guys are gone.

Gossett Jr IS awesome, I will give you that.

Jason Gedrick is just horrible.

He played a strip club manager in the latest season of Dexter. That role suits him LOL
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  #14  
Old 02-04-2013, 03:22 PM
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Comparing Iron Eagle to Top Gun is really comparing Apples to Oranges. I like both, for way different reasons. Iron Eagle has awesome plane sequences, and a kid-hacker/genius. It was about tactics and strategy. Top Gun was an adrenaline junkie, testorone inducing fun movie. They are both great movies, but for widely different reasons.

I am glad to hear that the 3D transfer looks so well, and the picture has been cleaned up so well. With a price under $20, I am finally going to replace my HD-DVD. Glad to hear the 3D is so well done!
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  #15  
Old 02-04-2013, 04:00 PM
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Mike, can you talk some more on this point from the review?

Quote:
an MPEG-4 MVC encode framed (for the most part) in the film's original 2.39:1 aspect ratio.

---

Further, while l adore 'The Dark Knight' Blu-ray for its IMAX-replicating aspect ratio shifts, I was taken a little off guard when the sides of this frame began cropping in and out. Presumably this inch or two (on my 65-inch display) of "pillar boxing" was done to ensure the sides of the frame matched the depth of the location, but it's definitely jarring the first time through. Look for these shots in hallways, cockpits, and in ocean environments.
Do the pillarboxed shots retain the same 2.39:1 top and bottom lines (meaning black bars on all four sides of the frame), or do they expand to the height of the 16:9 screen to give a pseudo-IMAX effect? (Since the movie was shot in Super 35, something like that is feasible.) What is the actual aspect ratio of those shots, and how often does it happen?

Thanks.
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  #16  
Old 02-04-2013, 04:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich86 View Post
Too bad Paramount couldn't be bothered to remaster the 2D version of this film for this release - I might have been tempted to replace my HD-DVD.
May still pick it up [watchED "Nemo" in retro 3D last night/better than some "real" 3D flicks].
Butt yeah, if the new release contained a freshly minted better 2D transfer I'd be at the door when the store openED!!!
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  #17  
Old 02-04-2013, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJScorpio View Post
I feel the need...the need for a new 3D tv.
+1 but UHDTV.
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  #18  
Old 02-04-2013, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post
Mike, can you talk some more on this point from the review?



Do the pillarboxed shots retain the same 2.39:1 top and bottom lines (meaning black bars on all four sides of the frame), or do they expand to the height of the 16:9 screen to give a pseudo-IMAX effect? (Since the movie was shot in Super 35, something like that is feasible.) What is the actual aspect ratio of those shots, and how often does it happen?

Thanks.
Sure. TG3D never fills the frame (ala Titanic 3D being 1.78:1 v 2.35:1 for 2D). It's not really pillarboxing, which is why i put in the quotes, only the closest way to describe the phenomenon. But to be more specific:

Top and bottom black bars remain constant through the entire film, but the sides -- depending on the shot -- pop in and out. Sometimes just the left side, sometimes just the right, sometimes both. I doubt many people will notice, especially if you have overscan on at all. But I always watch things full frame and, on my 65-inch VT50, that meant 1-2 inches of black appearing whenever this shot-by-shot phenomenon occurred. One thing I didn't say before is that it might have only been on one eye (i have an active shutter display), rather than both, but I still noticed it.

As I said in the review, my theory for this has to do with depth. Meaning, if they didn't crop in, the edge of the frame might not have matched the depth of the object touching the side of the frame. For example, there are a few hallways/corridor scenes. It's clear, from the framing, that one side of the hallway both touches the screen's edge, BUT in 3D space should be a few feet away. This seems to correct that by lining up the screen's edge with proper distance.

Does that make any sense? I wish someone else I knew had seen this because I don't remember anything like it in Titanic or Avengers (both conversions). Cheers.

*Edit to answer one more question:

as for how often, i would guess maybe (at most) in the 3-5% range (if that sounds like a lot, then round down -- it's not very often). I noticed it first on wide ocean shots with the carrier in the distance, in a few of the cockpit shots, and in long hallways where solid objects connected with the frame's edge.
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  #19  
Old 02-04-2013, 06:36 PM
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I never bought the hd dvd version of this flick. Never owned this on blu. Picking this one up Day 1.
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  #20  
Old 02-04-2013, 08:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Palmer View Post
Sure. TG3D never fills the frame (ala Titanic 3D being 1.78:1 v 2.35:1 for 2D). It's not really pillarboxing, which is why i put in the quotes, only the closest way to describe the phenomenon. But to be more specific:

Top and bottom black bars remain constant through the entire film, but the sides -- depending on the shot -- pop in and out. Sometimes just the left side, sometimes just the right, sometimes both. I doubt many people will notice, especially if you have overscan on at all. But I always watch things full frame and, on my 65-inch VT50, that meant 1-2 inches of black appearing whenever this shot-by-shot phenomenon occurred. One thing I didn't say before is that it might have only been on one eye (i have an active shutter display), rather than both, but I still noticed it.

As I said in the review, my theory for this has to do with depth. Meaning, if they didn't crop in, the edge of the frame might not have matched the depth of the object touching the side of the frame. For example, there are a few hallways/corridor scenes. It's clear, from the framing, that one side of the hallway both touches the screen's edge, BUT in 3D space should be a few feet away. This seems to correct that by lining up the screen's edge with proper distance.

Does that make any sense? I wish someone else I knew had seen this because I don't remember anything like it in Titanic or Avengers (both conversions). Cheers.

*Edit to answer one more question:

as for how often, i would guess maybe (at most) in the 3-5% range (if that sounds like a lot, then round down -- it's not very often). I noticed it first on wide ocean shots with the carrier in the distance, in a few of the cockpit shots, and in long hallways where solid objects connected with the frame's edge.
It the 3D offset (left eye/right eye)... Often people wont notice it on 1.78 projects. This is most likely due to the image being filled top to bottom. This is more noticeable on 2.35 projects...

Avatar and Titanic do have a limited amount of this, but if you dig something out like A Christmas Carol or Transformer Dark of the Moon, you will see it.

The larger the depth of image offset, the more obvious.

fitprod
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