Some items that are needed to record premium movies from cable onto a Blu-ray disc - High-Def Digest Forums
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Old 09-23-2011, 06:25 AM
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Default Some items that are needed to record premium movies from cable onto a Blu-ray disc

** Warning: I have not tested the following configuration yet to verify that it will work, in theory it will work just fine as long as the HD DVR software being used does not encrypt the TV recordings on the hard drive **


Some items that are needed to record premium movies from cable and other TV programs onto a 128GB, 100GB, 50GB, or 25GB Blu-ray disc

1. Ceton Corporation has made an internal PCI express card that has 4 QAM 64/256 tuners with a M cable card slot. This PCI express card with an M cableCARD subscription allows one to record 4 premium HD or SD channels at once, including all premium and encrypted cable channels that one currently subscribes too. Recordings are made to internal or external PC hard drives. Any computer on the home network will be able to access the recordings.

4 Tuner card available at Amazon for $299 plus free shipping

Product specs

2. With a high-end 7,200 RPM 3TB hard drive one will have several hundreds of hours to record 1080I and 720P movies to their PC’s HD DVR. Add two or more 3TB hard drives for even more storage capacity.

Seagate 3TB 7,200 RPM hard drive is available at Amazon for around $247.20 with free shipping

3. The Pioneer BDR-206MBK was launched in the fourth quarter of 2010 as the world’s first BDXL Blu-ray drive. It is currently the world’s only internal BDXL computer drive. I have not installed the Pioneer BDR-206MBK computer drive yet but I will be doing so soon.


One can copy TV programs from their hard drive to a Blu-ray computer recorder with the proper software

Cable providers and content providers under the 5C copy protection system will mark a program or channel as either “copy never”, “copy once”, or copy freely”. Copy never normally is for pay per view channels and it prevents one from even recording the program. Most cable companies mark their cable channels or individual programs as either “copy once” or “copy freely”. Copy once will only allow consumers to copy directly to their HD DVR hard drive device. Programs and channels that are marked as copy freely will allow one with the proper software to legally copy a TV program from the HD DVR to a Blu-ray computer recorder or another hard drive. Once the TV program is placed onto a 50GB or 25GB Blu-ray disc using a Blu-ray movie creation program the TV programs can be played back on any standalone Blu-ray player or Blu-ray device.

http://www.missingremote.com/guide/cablecard-tuner-essentials


Warning: Being able to copy a TV program from the internal hard drive used as a DVR will require the TV program 5C copy protection to be marked as “copy freely”. TV programs that are marked as copy once or never will not be allowed to be burned onto a Blu-ray disc under the 5C copy protection system.
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Old 09-24-2011, 11:33 AM
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I've been using one of these for about 9 months now:
http://www.amazon.com/Hauppauge-1212...6877639&sr=8-1

It's quite nice. Still needs a computer, but it's a nice little device that captures 1080i AVC and Dolby 5.1 audio. It lets you save in TS files, which can be edited without need for re-encoding with free software. In fact, all the software I use for things like this is freely available.

TS files can be played by many video players (the WD TV Live, for example), and can be burned directly to BD or AVCHD without need for transcoding.

A 3TB hard drive is overkill if you don't plan to keep archives of all your recordings on the drive. If you're making discs, it seems silly to keep the digital files too.

Still, I'd recommend using several smaller drives if you do keep everything. They are available much cheaper: a 2TB Caviar Black drive from WD is about $160. However, you really don't need performance drives for compressed video capture. The highest feasible bitrate you would capture at is about 30 Mb/s, which is only ~3.5 MB/sec. That's within the range of a USB stick (exaggeration). You can thus get by with much cheaper 5400 RPM drives, available for $80 for 2TB (3 TB will cost you $140--not worth it).

Smaller drives are also easier and cheaper to back up (you should buy 2X the space you want), and make your life easier when one of them does eventually fail.

Keep in mind that broadcast HD is ~20 Mb/s MPEG-2, so you don't need that high of a capture bitrate to keep all the quality. I capture at the Hauppage's maximum bitrate of 13.5 Mb/s (VBR), and the result seems transparent with the original.
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Old 09-25-2011, 02:36 AM
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The 7,200 RPM 3TB hard drive was for someone that was going to record 4 HD channels at the same time on one PC. Plus maybe watch a TV program on the DVR at the same time 4 are being recorded.

Wow, thanks for the link. I see that there is an internal PC card available also called the Video Capture 01414 for $146.57 at Amazon.

I did not know this item was available on the market. It supports up to 1080i HDMI signal input for recording unencrypted 1080i HDMI sources. Wow!! Of course (HDCP) High Definition content protected programs will not be able to be recorded over HDMI. The Hauppauge card has a rare 1080i component video input for TV sources that do not have any analog macrovision.

Since HDMI is digital the backup copy would in theory be bit for bit the same as the source material if the card offered higher bit rates (maybe converting from MPEG-2 to H.264 can be done with no or little quality loss over HDMI).

I am against pirating of store bought Blu-ray discs. Most people that attempt that try to break the BD+ encryption system with a computer, special software, and a Blu-ray burner. Many BD+ Blu-rays are 100% secure with the renewable security that prevents people from making a perfect copy of a Blu-ray disc. The encryption code keeps changing on new titles to keep the discs secure.

I see why the AACS has mandated that all component video outputs on Blu-ray players to either be removed completely or reduced form 1080i to 480i quality when playing Blu-ray discs. Some consumers are most likely buying a $150 Video capture card with 1080i component video inputs and with special analog copy protection removal devices they are able to record Blu-rays at 1080i quality. I am against piracy but I understand why soon all analog video outputs will be removed or disabled from all future Blu-ray players to plug the analog hole. The future is HDMI only Blu-ray players.
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Old 09-25-2011, 02:52 AM
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I also purchase studio stamped Blu-ray discs since they offer better quality than cable 1080i channels. My family member is just interested in some news programs and TV shows that have not been released on Blu-ray and sometimes not even released on DVD yet. Personaly for me I do not have the time to record programs on video tape or optical disc. I prefer store bought Blu-rays which also is the best possible quality.

My family member that wanted the 4 tuner PC QAM tuner card might change there mind now since Verizon’s new HD DVR’s offer more than 20 hours of HD recording time. It appears I talked my family member in to getting a new Cisco Verizon box with a 500GB hard drive and an external E-SATA hard drive to increase their recording time instead of using the PC. So I might never get a chance to try the above computer configuration with a 4 tuner cable card. Verizon FIOS encrypts all the TV programs stored on the internal and external hard drive. Most HD DVR’s that use a cable card does so these days since they do not want people copying programs to a second hard drive. Direct TV and Dish Network also encrypt the internal and external hard drive last time I checked. Program providers do not want people to make a backup copy of the TV programs. If the hard drive is encrypted when the HD DVR stores TV programs it over rides the 5C copy protection system and one will not even be able to make a backup copy of the local news on CBS, ABC, or NBC. Disappearing are the days when one was able to keep a copy of a TV program.


Anyways in the old days Verizon only offered 20 hours of HD recording time for a whole house network HD DVR. After talking with Verizon that has now changed this year in the last few months with the new Cisco boxes.
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Old 09-25-2011, 11:29 PM
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I only record TV shows that often don't even hit DVD, let alone Blu-ray, from TV broadcasts. Most of the time, I'm only interested in single episodes of said shows.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTV1080P View Post
The 7,200 RPM 3TB hard drive was for someone that was going to record 4 HD channels at the same time on one PC. Plus maybe watch a TV program on the DVR at the same time 4 are being recorded.
In that case, I'd really recommend getting 2x 2TB drives, or 3x 1 TB drives. It will cost less and be a bit more reliable. The HDD won't have an issue with speed (even high-bitrate recording barely scratches what a 5400 RPM drive can do), but the hardware encoder might not have a large enough buffer to wait for the HDD writes, resulting in dropped frames.

Some say more drives increase the risk for failure (true), but I think it's a bit better because it makes a failure much easier to deal with. It's much easier to store and move 1TB backups than 3TB backups. It also means that if your backup solution has problems (you neglect it), you don't lose absolutely everything.
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Old 09-26-2011, 12:09 AM
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It’s too late, I already ordered all the parts I need for the install and currently have the 3TB hard drive and Pioneer BDXL burner. I am using the top of the line 3TB hard drive with 7,200RPM. I only paid around $221 for it which is an excellent deal for a ST330005N1A1AS-RK 3TB hard drive. My family member might request a second 3TB hard drive to increase recording space to 6TB which would easily offer over 1,000 hours of HD recording time.

If the 4 tuner QAM computer card with cableCard slot does not encrypt the recordings on the hard drive and also if the 5C copy protection is set to copy always for the programs being recorded then a perfect bit for bit copy of the program can be placed on a Blu-ray disc. I will have the tuner on Monday and later on Verizon will be mailing me the cableCard to activate the tuner (cableCard has not been ordered yet, it costs $3.99 a month from Verizon).

The PC has 24GB of 1600Mhz DDR3 memory which will be ideal for recording 4 HD channels at once while working on other tasks.

This is not for me but another family member requested it.
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Old 09-26-2011, 11:39 AM
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$221 is a very good price for a 3TB drive. That's about what a 2TB + 1 TB would cost you.

Just for future reference, you don't need a very powerful PC with that card. It has a hardware encoder, which means the card does all the heavy lifting. CPU and RAM usage should be rather low with it (but does depend on what software you use with it).
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Old 12-17-2011, 04:02 AM
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Update on the Ceton 4 QAM tuner with 3TB hard drive

I should have posted this information back in late September or October but I have been busy working on projects. The Ceton Corporation 4 tuner internal QAM computer card with an M cablecard is working great for one of my family members. They are able to record 4 HD programs at the same time while playing back a previously recorded HD program on their desktop computer. The HD DVR software appears to do a bit for bit digital copy of the original HD or SD channel onto the hard drive. A 7,200 RPM 3TB hard drive works great for several hundred hours of HD recordings from premium channels like HBO, Showtime, etc. Also the internal computer card allows one to stream HD and SD cable channels to any PC on the home network.

The electronic TV guide is within Windows Media Center. There is even an option in Windows Media Center to copy the TV programs onto an optical disc. But I have not had time to see if the software will allow me to copy a TV program from the hard drive to a Blu-ray disc. As long as the program on the hard drive is not encrypted and as long as the program is marked as copy freely than there should be no problem to transfer a HD cable program from the hard drive to a Blu-ray disc.
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