128GB BDXL Blu-ray internal computer drives are available now and are ideal for data - High-Def Digest Forums
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Old 09-21-2011, 04:34 AM
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Default 128GB BDXL Blu-ray internal computer drives are available now and are ideal for data

128GB BDXL Blu-ray internal computer drives are available now and are ideal for data storage


Pioneer over the years has had an excellent reputation for making high quality optical recorders. In the DVD days I had problems with many brands of DVD computer recorder drives until I tried the Pioneer brand which offered the best compatibility for data storage on a wide variety of blank media. Sure there are other good brands to choose from on the market but Pioneer is one of the best if not the best in optical storage drives.

The Pioneer BDR-206MBK was launched in the fourth quarter of 2010 as the world’s first BDXL Blu-ray drive. It is currently the world’s only internal BDXL computer drive. I have not installed the Pioneer BDR-206MBK computer drive yet but I will be doing so soon. The ability to store 128GB of data on an optical disc is ideal. When searching online the BDR-206MBK and BDR-206 models are entirely different Blu-ray computer drives (The BDR-206 is 12X speed with no BDXL support). Pioneer should have made different model numbers because it is easy for the average consumer to get the two similar model numbers mixed up when the only difference in model numbers is "MBK".

Sure there are faster and cheaper Blu-ray recorders for data and family HD video storage like the Pioneer BDR-206 which does 12X speed but those drives are limited to a maximum of 50GB discs for reading and writing. The Pioneer BDR-206MBK only negative is that it writes at a slow 6X speed instead of 12X speed. The Pioneer BDR-206MBK big advantage is that it is the worlds first BDXL computer drive that handles 100GB triple layer and 128GB quad layer Blu-ray media. As far as I am aware 128GB blank media is not available yet and when it is released it might cost over $100 (USB 128GB flash drives run around $200) until prices come down over time. Triple layer 100GB BD-R XL media is currently running around $74.50 until prices come down (Around $144.50 for BD-RE XL 100GB media). Blu-ray dual layer 50GB discs are under $5 and 25GB single layer discs are now under $1 which is more affordable. For those that want to back up an entire small hard drive 128GB optical media are ideal. Plus optical discs are 100% immune to naturally occurring or manmade EMP’s and immune to strong magnetic fields (Solid state drives, USB flash drives, hard drives, and floppy discs can be erased with strong EMP’s and/or strong magnetic fields). Some high-end brands of optical discs can also last up to 100 years compared to some USB sticks that are rated at 10 years before they go bad.

100GB triple layer and 128GB quad layer BDXL Blu-ray discs can only be played back on a BDXL Blu-ray computer drive. Standard Blu-ray players cannot handle anymore than a dual layer 50GB discs. Hopefully standalone BDXL recorders with ATSC/QAM tuners and a cable card built in might one day be offered in the United States. Computer BDXL drives can store many hours of HD broadcasts on a 128GB discs with the right hardware and software combination. Optical discs are ideal for backing up home made family videos.

Best prices on the Pionner BDR-206MBK


The Pioneer BDR-206MBK list price is $199. The first generation Pioneer 50GB Blu-ray computer drives back in May of 2006 cost $999.99. For only $179.95 with free shipping one can purchase the worlds first 6X speed internal BDXL drive that comes with Cyberlink software and for a limited time 100GB BD-R XL blank write once disc is included. On Amazon that same 100GB Sharp BD-R XL disc is selling for $74.50 each.

1. Pioneer Elctronics website $199.
http://www.pioneerelectronics.com/PUSA/Home/Blu-ray-Disc-and-DVD/Computer-Drives/BDR-206MBK

2. B and H Photo ($179.95 with free shipping)
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/817671-REG/Pioneer_BDR_206MBKS_BDR_206MBK_12x_Internal_BDXL_D VD_CD.html

3. Micro Center ($179.99 plus shipping) Has the best quality picture of what comes with the Blu-ray drive
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0361931






Last edited by HDTV1080P; 09-21-2011 at 06:47 AM.
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Old 09-21-2011, 05:14 PM
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That would make some expensive coasters.
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Old 09-21-2011, 09:24 PM
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Yeah....still not worth it. I was/am an early adopter of BD-R.....but I can't see myself jumping on this. Especially when the ONLY player to able to use the discs will be my PC....not every Blu-ray player like my current BD-R's...
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Old 09-22-2011, 01:46 AM
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50GB BD-R media is *still* quite expensive. I just don't see the 100GB and 128GB media hitting any sort of consumer price point, this is likely to be an enterprise tool for the life of the product. Too bad, the drive looks great and is actually priced quite reasonably.
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Old 09-22-2011, 08:04 AM
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When and if 100GB and 128GB BDXL media falls in price most consumers would use that media for long term PC data backups. Most consumers would not use 100GB and 128GB BDXL media for video storage since they could not play their home made movies on any standalone Blu-ray player. 50GB BD-R’s for under $5 a disc is ideal for HD camcorder video storage.
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Old 09-22-2011, 09:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTV1080P View Post
When and if 100GB and 128GB BDXL media falls in price most consumers would use that media for long term PC data backups. Most consumers would not use 100GB and 128GB BDXL media for video storage since they could not play their home made movies on any standalone Blu-ray player. 50GB BD-R’s for under $5 a disc is ideal for HD camcorder video storage.
I disagree with this, I think the BDXL will be a niche market. Hard drives are so cheap now that a hard drive makes the best backup. I know you say long term, but a hard drive sitting in a drawer is pretty safe. Most people would use an external hard drive, I myself have spare internal drives and use a drop-in dock and use Norton Ghost for exact copies of the drive.
Excluding the problems associated with new media where the reflective layer flakes off (this happened in CDR and DVDR media early on,) the BDXL will have a limited playback ability due to its proprietary format. I cannot remember the last time I burned a disc, any format for that matter.
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Old 09-22-2011, 03:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Krawk View Post
Hard drives are so cheap now that a hard drive makes the best backup.
I agree, and this has been true for a long time already. They are also physically smaller than the physical space required for a stack of discs with comparable total capacity. And your stuff is in one place instead of spread across multiple discs.

Also, my older optical discs (CD-R and DVD+/-R) are experiencing bit rot. They look perfect, no scratches, but many times the data is now bad. Stamped optical discs may last 100 years, but I am really skeptical that burned optical discs will.
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Old 09-23-2011, 04:18 AM
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Optical disc brands like Verbatim can last 50 to 100 years. Some lower quality blank media can physically go bad over time. Stamped optical discs in theory should be able to last several hundred years or longer under ideal conditions. All the age ratings are estimates since optical discs for the consumer market have only been around since 1978.

There are some laserdiscs from 1978 that are still in perfect condition after 33 years. Of course some laserdiscs by some owners experienced laser rot due to bad quality manufacturing processes.

There are pluses and minuses to all technologies. Maybe BDXL 128GB discs or some new 200GB+ optical technology around the year 2016 might offer consumers 4K native movies.
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Old 09-23-2011, 04:33 AM
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Standalone BDXL recorders are being made in Japan. Standalone optical Blu-ray recorders in Japan are very popular. Maybe sometime in the future we will see a 128GB standalone BDXL recorder in the United States with built in downloadable cable card or cable card slot. Blu-ray would become more popular in the United States if standalone BDXL recorders were released in the USA also.
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